Today, in a statement from Jean-Pierre Blais, Chairman and CEO of the CRTC announced a CRTC decision that will now give Canadians freedom of choice in their TV Service as part of their Let's Talk TV initiative.  By March 2016, Canadians will have access to an entry-level television service that costs no more than $25 per month that would include local and mandatory channels such as APTN, TVO, CPAC, educational channels, accessibility channels, PBS and four American Channels (NBC, ABC, CBS and Fox).  By December 2016, Canadian subscribers will be able to subscribe to individual channels on a pick-and-pay basis, as well as in small packages.  This decision will make it more affordable and maximize choices for Canadians. 

Here are the "Quick Facts" from today's News Release:

  • The CRTC has set out a roadmap to maximize choice and affordability for Canadians television viewers.

  • By March 2016, Canadians will be able to subscribe to an entry-level television service that cost no more than $25 as an alternative to the basic services currently being offered by cable and satellite companies.
  • The entry-level television service will include:
        - all local and regional television stations,
        - public interest channels such as the Cable Public Affairs Channel and Aboriginal Peoples Television Network,
        - education channels,
        - and, if offered, community channels and the services operated by provincial legislatures.
  • Canadians will be able to supplement their entry-level service by subscribing to pay and specialty channels on a pick-and-pay basis or in small packages.
  • By December 2016, viewers will be able to subscribe to channels on a pick-and-pay basis as well as in small packages.
  • Cable and satellite companies can continue to offer their existing packages of channels in order to provide alternative options to television viewers.
  • By expanding the current obligation to distribute one French-language channel for every 10 English channels to satellite companies, Canadians living in official-language minority communities will have access to services that meet their needs.
  • Canadians living in official-language minority communities will also have access to educational programs in their language, including programs for children and youth.
  • Canada's multicultural communities will have greater access to Canadian ethnic and third-language channels.
  • A code will clarify the wholesale relationship between television service providers and broadcasters, to the benefit of consumers.

Let's Talk TV was launched in 2013  and one of the goals was to ensure TV services would adapt to viewers' changing habits and preferences.   Today's CRTC decision was made after reviewing more than 13,000 comments from Canadians.  In March 2016, TV Subscribers can now choose content and choices in channels they want and more choice in the packages they select.  

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